The dance of anger pdf

Some have a learned the dance of anger pdf to react to anger through retaliation as a way of coping. Anger is an emotional reaction that impacts the body. Anger is used as a protective mechanism to cover up fear, hurt or sadness.

Anger becomes the predominant feeling behaviorally, cognitively, and physiologically when a person makes the conscious choice to take action to immediately stop the threatening behavior of another outside force. Anger can have many physical and mental consequences. Some animals, for example, make loud sounds, attempt to look physically larger, bare their teeth, and stare. The behaviors associated with anger are designed to warn aggressors to stop their threatening behavior. Rarely does a physical altercation occur without the prior expression of anger by at least one of the participants.

While most of those who experience anger explain its arousal as a result of “what has happened to them,” psychologists point out that an angry person can very well be mistaken because anger causes a loss in self-monitoring capacity and objective observability. Modern psychologists view anger as a primary, natural, and mature emotion experienced by virtually all humans at times, and as something that has functional value for survival. Anger is seen as a supportive mechanism to show a person that something is wrong and requires changing. Anger can mobilize psychological resources for corrective action. While many philosophers and writers have warned against the spontaneous and uncontrolled fits of anger, there has been disagreement over the intrinsic value of anger. The issue of dealing with anger has been written about since the times of the earliest philosophers, but modern psychologists, in contrast to earlier writers, have also pointed out the possible harmful effects of suppressing anger.

It is shared by human and other animals, and it occurs when the animal is tormented or trapped. This form of anger is episodic. Irritability, sullenness, and churlishness are examples of the last form of anger. It can also facilitate patience. In contrast, anger can be destructive when it does not find its appropriate outlet in expression. While anger can activate aggression or increase its probability or intensity, it is neither a necessary nor a sufficient condition for aggression. Extension of the Stimuli of the Fighting Reactions.

At the beginning of life the human infant struggles indiscriminately against any restraining force, whether it be another human being or a blanket which confines his movements. There is no inherited susceptibility to social stimuli, as distinct from other stimulation, in anger. At a later date the child learns that certain actions, such as striking, scolding, and screaming, are effective toward persons, but not toward things. In adults, although the infantile response is still sometimes seen, the fighting reaction becomes fairly well limited to stimuli whose hurting or restraining influence can be thrown off by physical violence. Anger, when viewed as a protective response or instinct to a perceived threat, is considered as positive. The negative expression of this state is known as aggression.

Acting on this misplaced state is Rage due to possible potential errors in perception and judgment. To avoid conceived loss or fear that something will be taken away. To prevent a change in functioning. To meet one’s own needs.

This differs from retributive justice, as vengeance is personal, and possibly unlimited in scale. This is in fact, common in discipline terms. Anger expression can take on many more styles than passive or aggressive. Ephrem Fernandez has identified six bipolar dimensions of anger expression. They relate to the direction of anger, its locus, reaction, modality, impulsivity, and objective. Coordinates on each of these dimensions can be connected to generate a profile of a person’s anger expression style. Graham defines anger in terms of our expectations and assumptions about the world.